How Seasonal Branding Helps to Increase Sales?

“Holiday spending” no longer refers to products that are purchased during just the winter months. There is ample evidence which suggests that spending on other holidays of the year such as Mother’s Day or Easter is slowly climbing.

If you look at sales figures for all holidays in question, it is quite obvious that consumer-based holidays generate large spikes in sales. While running promotions during the holidays at the end of the year can be extremely beneficial for creating hype, brands are starting to realize the importance of creating the same kind of hype for other holidays. While UK consumers are pressured with rising inflation, that doesn’t seem to have much of an impact on the online sales, which can be gauged by the graphic given below. In fact, online sales are expected to account for around 21.5% of the retail industry in 2018 in the UK.  Companies wanting to be part of the supply for this demand need to be aware of how to adjust their own brands to best fit the consumers' search.

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What is Seasonal Branding?

Before we can get into the benefits of seasonal branding, we need to understand what it is. Seasonal branding or promotions are those special discounts, offers or limited-edition items that are tied to a specific event or back to school season. The whole idea of creating a seasonal marketing campaign is to attract the attention of a target audience towards your brand.

Seasonal branding isn’t a complete makeover of an existing branding strategy, but rather an extension of existing marketing efforts to attract customers and increase sales during important holidays of the year, for instance, the eight bank holidays in England and Wales, not to mention Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Types of Holidays

There are three types of holidays that marketers have their eyes on from the start of the year.

  • Recognized Holidays — These are well-known holidays such as Early May Bank Holiday, Spring Bank Holiday, Summer Bank Holiday, Valentine’s Day, Christmas, Black Friday, etc.
  • Annual Events —These are those periods of time when certain cultural events occur. A good example of this type of holiday would be the back-to-school season, which occurs between August and September.
  • Non-Traditional Holidays — These are the holidays that are not considered real holidays but can be classified as such nonetheless because they serve a particular purpose. For example, there is National Craft Month or National Coffee Day.

Before a business can take advantage of seasonal branding (i.e. adding a Santa hat on the logo or adapting colours in the brand to an autumn leaves pattern), they must first understand what roles a holiday plays in their promotions. That’s because not every holiday or annual even will apply to a particular product.

Are You Providing a Satisfying Online Buying Experience?

This brings us to the most crucial part of any online sale. According to a survey by Barclaycard, the average British online shopper abandons baskets worth £29.37 every month. Why is that?

To find out the reason for these low conversion rates business need to ask what the recent report from Qubit asked more than 4000 customers the following question:

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Knowing which Season/Holiday to Target

Continuously latching on to each and every holiday of the year with a full-fledged promotional campaign will cut into your profits. On the other hand, depending on the product you are selling, certain holidays or seasons in the year could really add value to your branding efforts. A great example can be given of Autumn when there’s a spike in gardening appliances and products, such as grass lawn seeds, weed killer, hedge shears, and leaf rakes. They say that those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. In the case of e-commerce businesses, the seasonality of the shopper is something that is counted on.

Seasonal branding can help create a stronger connection between the customer and your brand because brands that cater to seasonal wants and needs of the consumer seem more personable and relatable. While the total average eCommerce spend per consumer is estimated at £1,600 over the course of the year in the UK, according to Barclaycard, nominal spending was 4% higher [ft.com] between November 19 and December 23 in 2017, as compared to previous years, which also happens to be a span which includes Black Friday and Cyber Monday.  Tying your brand to those events at a core level helps users connect the brand with the holiday in the minds of your shoppers. 

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The Offline Experience

Much of this is targetted towards the online market - but that doesn't mean it's not relevant to the high street brands and face to face traders.  For most of these, social media and online communications are a crucial component to interacting with their demographic.  This is where a customised and seasonal brand helps entice your client and solidify that connection between the holiday and the company.  For all of living memory, we've seen shops deck their aisles and fill their windows with seasonal and festive displays.  As shoppers start to understand the concept of branding more and more, it's only natural that this seasonal acknowledgement spreads.  Social media, in-store posters, and staff nametags are just three great ways to make your brand seasonal.

Ending Note

Since consumers are already going to be thinking about upcoming holidays and seasons, putting your seasonal campaign up front with a solid marketing campaign surrounding that product can create a nice buzz around your brand that will help feed that seasonal excitement. According to A Marketer’s Paradox of Strategy VS Practice, two-thirds of consumers expect a same-day response to queries about a particular product or service, and 43% expecting a response within an hour, so companies need to have their finger on the pulse at all times if they want to stay ahead of the curve.